Boston Marathon Then & Now: Revisiting the bombing sites

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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 10, 2014 photos, the first provided by Bob Leonard, shows people running away from a bomb blast along Boylston Street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, and a patron entering a taxi on the same street nearly a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Bob Leonard; and Elise Amendola)
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This combination of April 19, 2013 and April 9, 2014 photos show police going door-to-door as they searched for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Watertown, Mass., and a child walking past the same home after school almost a year later. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
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This combination of April 16, 2013 and April 9, 2014 photos show a runner passing a police officer dressed in tactical gear blocking a road leading to the Boston Marathon route the morning after two bomb blasts killed three people and injured 260 more, and traffic on that street almost a year later during a normal weekday in Boston. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 10, 2014 photos show a view of Boylston Street in front of the Marathon Sports store, left, the site where the first of two bombs exploded near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, and pedestrians walking along the same sidewalk almost a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 10, 2014 photos show a view of Boylston Street in front of the Forum restaurant, where investigators comb for evidence at the site where the second of two bombs exploded near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, and pedestrians walking past the same spot almost a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 2, 2014 photos show a police officer clearing Boylston Street following a bomb blast near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, and pedestrians crossing at the same corner nearly a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 14, 2014 photos shows medical workers aiding injured people along Boylston Street after the first of two bombs exploded near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, then pedestrians walking along the same sidewalk almost a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 10, 2014 photos show views of Boylston Street with people on the ground after the first of two bombs exploded near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, then pedestrians walking along the same sidewalk almost a year later in Boston. (AP Photo/MetroWest Daily News, Ken McGagh; and Elise Amendola)
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Boston Marathon bombing survivor John Odom stands with his wife Karen during a flag raising ceremony at Boston Medical Center on Monday, April 14, 2014. (AP Photo/The Herald, Matt Stone)
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This combination of April 15, 2013 and April 14, 2014 photos shows medical workers aiding injured people on Boylston Street near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following two bomb explosions, and nearly a year later traffic flowing on the same street as preparations are being made for the 2014 Boston Marathon in Boston. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
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This combination of April 19, 2013 and April 9, 2014 photos show law enforcement authorities searching for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Watertown, Mass., and a view of the same street as children return home from school almost a year later. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
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Boston Marathon bombing survivor Heather Abbott carries a symbolic torch as she crosses the marathon finish line in Boston, Sunday, April 13, 2014, for the last leg of a cross country charity run that began in March in California. Abbott, along with other survivors and family members joined the relay runners for the final half-block to the finish. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

Description

A year after three people were killed and more than 260 injured when two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, the city's landscape bears few reminders of the explosions, or the ensuing manhunt for suspects that ended with the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Watertown.

On Boylston Street, the chaos and pain of that day has been replaced by the regular routines of pedestrians and drivers. Businesses are open again, including the restaurant Forum, badly damaged when one bomb exploded directly outside.

This week, barricades and a viewing stand are already set up near the finish line for this year's marathon, set for Monday.

Just down the street, Copley Square became home to a spontaneous memorial. The items, including running shoes and messages, were removed in June. Some are now on view in an exhibit across the street at the Boston Public Library.

A few days after the bombing, Tsarnaev eluded capture after a gun battle with police. Residents of Boston and surrounding communities were told to stay indoors while police went house to house searching for him.

Today, those neighborhoods are quiet again.


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