Most dangerous jobs in the U.S.

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Being a patrol officer is one of the most dangerous jobs in the United States, with a fatality/injury rate of 14.9 deaths per 100,000 hours worked. Firefighting is a less dangerous career, with 2.5 fatal injuries* per 100,000 hours worked in 2011, the last year for which the fatality rate is available. Fatal injuries to paid firefighters have declined over the past five years, dropping from 50 fatalities in 2007 to 17 deaths in 2012. The fatal work injury rate for all U.S. workers was 3.2 per 100,000 hours worked. (*The figure does not include supervisors or volunteer firefighters.)

The following ranking is ordered from fewest to most number of deaths in the included categories.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

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Police and sheriff's patrol officers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 104

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 14.9

Pictured: Assembled officers salute during the Presentation of Colors and the National Anthem at the 2013 Police Memorial Day ceremonies held inside the Police Memorial Building in Jacksonville on Thursday May 2, 2013. The observance honored the 60 Jacksonville police officers who have died in the line of duty since 1840, and includes a police Honor Guard salute, a gun salute and a Police Memorial day proclamation.

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General maintenance and repair workers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 66

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 15

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Construction laborers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 210

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 17.4

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Coal mining

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 20

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 18

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Farmers, ranchers, agricultural managers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 216

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 21.3

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Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 741

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 22.1

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Electrical power line installers and repairers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 26

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 23

Pictured: A JEA lineman pulls a line out of the intersection of Fouraker Road and Lenox Avenue after a tree fell and pulled it down on Monday, June 25, 2012 in Jacksonville.

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Refuse and recycle material collectors

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 26

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 27.1

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Structural iron and steel workers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 22

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 37

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Roofers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 70

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 40.5

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Aircraft pilots and flight attendants

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 71

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 53.4

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Fishers and related fishing workers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 32

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 117

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Logging workers

Total on-job fatalities (2012): 62

Fatality rate per 100,000 workers: 127.8

Description

Being a patrol officer is one of the most dangerous jobs in the United States, with a fatality/injury rate of 14.9 deaths per 100,000 hours worked. Firefighting is a less dangerous career, with 2.5 fatal injuries* per 100,000 hours worked in 2011, the last year for which the fatality rate is available. Fatal injuries to paid firefighters have declined over the past five years, dropping from 50 fatalities in 2007 to 17 deaths in 2012. The fatal work injury rate for all U.S. workers was 3.2 per 100,000 hours worked. (*The figure does not include supervisors or volunteer firefighters.)

The ranking is ordered from fewest to most number of deaths in the included categories.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Associated Press photos unless otherwise noted

 

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