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Hendrix president steps aside

Posted: February 15, 2013 - 9:40pm

The longtime Hendrix College president will step down and eventually return to being a professor at the college, spokesman Rob O’Connor said Friday.

J. Timothy Cloyd will leave his position effective immediately, according to a news release. Cloyd earned a base pay of about $314,000 a year, according to the college’s 2010 tax form.

“Here is one thing I have learned: Organizations are living, evolving organisms,” Cloyd wrote in email. “That is why through prayer and deep reflection with my family, I have decided that it is time for new leadership.”

Hendrix has just finished a major fundraising campaign so the timing for Cloyd stepping down ushers in a new period of planning at Hendrix, officials said.

Cloyd served as president of the private college for 12 years. He announced his decision to resign during the Board of Trustees meeting. After a sabbatical that starts immediately, Cloyd will return to the Hendrix faculty as a professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations next January and work in higher education consulting. During his sabbatical, Cloyd said in email he plans to “write, consult and explore other opportunities.”

Cloyd became the 10th president of Hendrix, a private college with a 1,388 enrollment, in October 2001 after serving as vice president for College Relations and Development for five years. Cloyd is 51.

During Cloyd’s presidential tenure, the college launched Your Hendrix Odyssey: Engaging in Active Learning. The program brought significant national recognition to Hendrix as a national model for engaged learning in higher education, according to the release. As a result of Odyssey, Hendrix received national media attention, including being featured on the front page of the New York Times and named one of the country’s “Up and Coming” liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report for five consecutive years.

Also during Cloyd’s tenure, the Hendrix student body and faculty grew by almost 40 percent, and Hendrix successfully completed a $100 million comprehensive campaign — the largest in the school’s history. The campaign helped Hendrix increased student financial assistance. The money also helped Hendrix projects that included the endowed innovative academic co-curricular and student life programs and developed facilities for art, science, literature and language, wellness and athletics.

The college increased student housing, building student apartments above the mixed-use buildings in The Village at Hendrix and a New Urbanist community adjacent to campus.

Hendrix played a lead role in the formation of the Rwanda Presidential Scholars initiative, with the support of the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation, and launched the Miller Center for Vocation, Ethics, and Calling and the Crain-Maling Center of Jewish Culture under Cloyd.

“President Cloyd has positioned Hendrix as a major innovator and nationally recognized leader in the field of engaged liberal arts education,” said Hendrix alumnus David Knight, trustee chairman, in a news release. “We are deeply grateful for President Cloyd’s bold vision and perseverance during these extraordinary times.”

Executive Vice President and CCO Frank Cox said Cloyd was a bold leader who was “good at communicating his vision.”

“He wasn’t afraid of change,” Cox said. “Tim was an innovator, that’s why he was valuable.”

W. Ellis Arnold III, executive vice president, general counsel and dean of Advancement, will serve as acting president during a national search for Cloyd’s successor. Arnold said in the release he looks forward to working with faculty, staff, students and alumni to “continue the advancement of the Hendrix mission.”

Cloyd said Hendrix will continue to move forward. He said he has received support and inspiration from the community that has been “necessary to achieve the greatness Hendrix has enjoyed.”

“We have carried the legacy of our founders, the United Methodist Church and our predecessors at Hendrix forward and, with the support of this community, Hendrix will continue to reach new horizons,” Cloyd said in the release.

(Staff writer Scarlet Sims can be reached by email at scarlet.sims@thecabin.net or by phone at 505-1246. To comment on this and other stories in the Log Cabin, log on to www.thecabin.net. Send us your news at www.thecabin.net/submit)

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Hennysmom
718
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Hennysmom 02/18/13 - 07:02 pm
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Now I get it..

I always wondered why someone at the pinnacle of their career, would shuck it...
http://t.co/Eech0vYa

Sometimes, when you have a problem it is smarter to just say you have a problem.

arkansan
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arkansan 02/18/13 - 08:17 pm
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More to the story than just a resignation.......

"Officers say Cloyd had "a strong smell of an intoxicating beverage about his person, and his speech was slightly slurred."

"The report says Cloyd was waiving a handgun with his finger on the trigger.
Conway Police say Cloyd refused multiple times to put his gun down, until they made him."
One officer explained what Cloyd was saying.

He says Cloyd was pointing his weapon in the direction of the suspect and said 'I am going to kill that m***** f***** myself." The officer says he ordered Cloyd to drop the weapon and he refused by responding "this is my ******** house, **** you."

"The officer did physically take the weapon from him," said Woodruff."

" Woodruff says Cloyd had a concealed carry license. Protecting his family wasn't the issue, it was his refusal to listen that worried them."

sevenof400
6793
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sevenof400 02/18/13 - 08:51 pm
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I'd say that Cloyd has no problem....

..in the area of communicating his vision...

'I am going to kill that m***** f***** myself' seems pretty clear.

On a more useful note, while Hendrix's reputation may (or may not) be growing, far fewer Arkansans can afford the college's rapidly escalating cost of attendance.

How sad to have a reputable institution of higher learning that so few native Arkansans can afford to attend.

i_wonder
27122
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i_wonder 02/19/13 - 12:26 am
6
4

so wait

Unpublished

Suspect is in his house and he's got the drop on him, doesn't shoot, and has to quit?

He was drunk at home. Perfectly legal (and we know my anti-alcohol stance)

He had a thief in his HOME at gun-point. Perfectly legal.

I don't see a problem here. I know, I know, he cussed in front of the cops, well I'd be pretty jacked-up if a thief was in my house too.

Just saying.

ARVoiceofLogic
4994
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ARVoiceofLogic 02/19/13 - 09:24 am
3
2

A drunk guy waving a gun with his finger on the trigger

Outside. Officers around. He waltzes outside and leaves the thief alone?

You don't see a problem here?

i_wonder
27122
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i_wonder 02/19/13 - 10:07 am
2
3

ah

Unpublished

You prefer he'd just shoot the guy, right?

Stand your ground, right?

You'd prefer he go Zimmerman on him, right?

Maybe he just wanted to scare the filtered word out of the guy, so that he wouldn't return.

I can assure you this, if someone breaks into my house while I'm home, I will do my darnest to ensure they never want to attempt it twice.

And, that's not "internets bravado" speaking, I'd be shaking like a leaf after the fact.

ARVoiceofLogic
4994
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ARVoiceofLogic 02/19/13 - 10:43 am
5
1

Honestly

I don't know if there is a right answer. However, I'm sure the police on site (anywhere) would not tolerate an intoxicated man with a gun.

"And, that's not "internets bravado" speaking, I'd be shaking like a leaf after the fact."
Ditto man. It's easy to talk in hypotheticals.

i_wonder
27122
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i_wonder 02/19/13 - 10:57 am
5
5

well

Unpublished

At least we don't live in L.A.

The cops there would have shot him and let the thief escape.

BuzzBy
17777
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BuzzBy 02/19/13 - 08:32 am
5
3

Sounds Like

Unpublished

He was doing a better job than CPD and they were just jealous.

Hennysmom
718
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Hennysmom 02/19/13 - 10:36 am
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Have gun will shoot if I want to..

The only thing he did wrong was not stand down when directed to. He had to be physically restrained in order to follow a directive from a police officer. This is what what makes the rest of us gun nuts look dangerous.

He then abruptly resigns from a very prestigious institution of learning.
He had to know this was coming, so instead of addressing it, holding his head up, acknowledging he got caught up in the adrenaline of the moment, then moving on, it turns around causing a little internet fuss.

Bless his heart and hope he feels better today.

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