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Bitter cold ushers in wind chill advisories, warnings

Posted: January 5, 2014 - 1:10pm
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This graphic, courtesy of the national weather service, shows the lowest forecasted wind chills for the next 24 hours in Arkansas.  COURTESY OF NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
COURTESY OF NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
This graphic, courtesy of the national weather service, shows the lowest forecasted wind chills for the next 24 hours in Arkansas.

As wintry weather precipitation moves its way out of the state, wind chill advisories and wind chill warnings have been issued for much of Arkansas as frigid temperatures and wind moves in.

The National Weather Service said "bitterly" cold weather is in the forecast from Sunday night into Tuesday morning. Meteorologist John Robinson said south Arkansas — which is expected to see lows in the teens — is included.

Much of central Arkansas, including Faulkner County, is currently under a wind chill advisory.

Highs on Monday will fall anywhere from single digits in parts of northern Arkansas to the upper 20s near the state's southern border.

By nightfall, lows will range from a few degrees below zero in parts of northern Arkansas to the teens in southwest Arkansas. Winds will make conditions worse, especially tonight and into Monday, Robinson said.

Current models show the coldest forecasted wind chill in Faulkner County is between five and nine degrees below zero. The McGee Center, located at 3800 College Avenue, will serve as a warming center from 6 p.m. Sunday to Tuesday, or as needed.

Temperatures are expected to steady Tuesday, Robinson said.  

Following is a list of safety tips for Arkansans during the cold weather:

•Check on the sick and elderly. Ensure that their heater is working and that they have adequate fuel supply.

•Bring pets inside during winter weather. Move other animals or livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking water.

•Keep cell phones fully charged in case of electricity loss.

•Have heater, chimneys and flues inspected and maintained properly to reduce fire hazard and risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

•Insulate water pipes and allow faucets to drip to prevent pipe freezing.

•Ponds may freeze, but ice might not be thick enough to support human weight. Do not walk on ice or frozen ponds.

•Carry a blanket and extra coat in vehicles in case of breakdowns or other incidents.

•To prevent fuel line freezes, keep gas tanks full in vehicles and use fuel additives to dissipate water in the fuel.

•Extreme cold will cause a weak car battery to fail when it is needed most. Have the vehicle’s battery tested.

•Prevent the risk of deadly carbon monoxide poisoning by using only traditional home heaters. Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning devices inside a home or other enclosed area. Keep such devices outdoors and away from doors, windows and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to flow indoors.

•Keep a working carbon monoxide detector inside the home.

•Never leave a vehicle running while it is parked in a garage, even if the garage door is open.

•Never plug a space heater into a power source that is not the direct outlet.

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