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Thumbs: Comment from the county, judges following rules, history of Donaghey and Bruce

Posted: April 10, 2014 - 3:26pm

Worth the effort. A positive move is Faulkner County putting proposed ordinances on its website for public comment before the Quorum Court votes on them. It is not easy to find these proposals, but they appear after some hunting on the page of “civil attorney.” The information is there but enclosed in bureaucratese.

A Mayflower mover. The obituary of Rev. Bill Patrick brought forth memories of a man who led Mayflower improvements a while back. At the top may have been developing a dependable water system. Once, Mayflower’s water was so bad it was not drinkable, not bathable, not suitable for washing clothes.

Unpleasant situations. Reading the daily news about shenanigans with contributions to politicians, including judges, lowers confidence in our whole public office system. True, many of the alleged infractions are minor, but if people can’t follow rules, why should they be entrusted with well-paying offices and administration of our tax money?

Gutsy performance. There should be no question about Connecticut’s men winning the national basketball title. They defeated Florida then Kentucky in the Final Four, both times by impressively outplaying the opposition. The Huskies’ experience overcame the raw talent of the Wildcats and John Calipari’s coaching skills in the title game.

Another TV head scratcher. In the Final Four telecasts from Jerry Jones’ palace in Arlington, Texas, the talking heads consistently called the location “North Texas” and never uttered “Arlington.” What is the deal? Did Arlington’s chamber of commerce fail to be nice somehow to these people?

A long history. The sale of the Papa John’s building at Donaghey and Bruce stirred memories for some Conway folks of, uh, advanced years. This was Terry’s Corner way back when, a grocery and eatery. Students stood outside and shouted “town” at passing vehicles, soliciting rides to downtown Conway.

“If you want natural gas at your stove, it costs a little more because we have to get it to you, we have to transport it on the pipeline, we have odorize it. There are just things we have to do.”

— Alicia Dixon of CenterPoint Energy

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